Indoor Localisation through Probabilistic Ontologies

  • Irina Mocanu University Politehnica of Bucharest
  • Georgiana Scarlat University Politehnica of Bucharest
  • Lucia Rusu Babes Bolyai University of Cluj-Napoca
  • Ionut Pandelica Agora University of Oradea
  • Bogdan Cramariuc IT Center for Science and Technology

Abstract

For elderly people that are living alone in their homes there is a need to permanently monitor them. One of this aspect consist in knowing their indoor position and motion behavioural status, in real time. One possibility for indoor positioning of an user consists in understanding the images provided by supervising cameras. In this case the main aspect is represented by recognition of objects from these images. Thus, object recognition plays an essential part in understanding the environment and adding meaning to it. This paper presents a method for indoor localisation based on identifying the user’s context. The user’s context is computed based on object recognition and using a probabilistic ontology. The key element is represented by the probabilistic ontology that describes objects, scenes and relations between them. This ontology contains probabilistic relations that are learned using a large database. Results show that given a set of object detectors with high detection rate and low false positive rate, the system can recognize the user’s context with high accuracy.

Author Biography

Irina Mocanu, University Politehnica of Bucharest
Associate ProfessorComputer Science Department

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Published
2018-11-29
How to Cite
MOCANU, Irina et al. Indoor Localisation through Probabilistic Ontologies. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMPUTERS COMMUNICATIONS & CONTROL, [S.l.], v. 13, n. 6, p. 988-1006, nov. 2018. ISSN 1841-9844. Available at: <http://univagora.ro/jour/index.php/ijccc/article/view/3022>. Date accessed: 24 sep. 2020. doi: https://doi.org/10.15837/ijccc.2018.6.3022.

Keywords

probabilistic ontologies